Harp Without the Crown, The

Play recording: Harp Without the Crown, The

Níl an taifead seo ar fáil faoi láthair.

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  • Teideal (Title): Harp Without the Crown, The.
  • Uimhir Chatalóige Ollscoil Washington (University of Washington Catalogue Number): none.
  • Uimhir Chnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann (National Folklore of Ireland Number): none.
  • Uimhir Roud (Roud Number): 7989.
  • Uimhir Laws (Laws Number): none.
  • Uimhir Child (Child Number): none.
  • Cnuasach (Collection): Joe Heaney Collection, University of Washington, Seattle.
  • Teanga na Croímhíre (Core-Item Language): English.
  • Catagóir (Category): song.
  • Ainm an té a thug (Name of Informant): Joe Heaney.
  • Ainm an té a thóg (Name of Collector): Ewan Mac Coll and Peggy Seeger.
  • Dáta an taifeadta (Recording Date): 1963.
  • Suíomh an taifeadta (Recording Location): London, England.
  • Ocáid an taifeadta (Recording Occasion): private.
  • Daoine eile a bhí i láthair (Others present): unavailable.
  • Stádas chóipcheart an taifeadta (Recording copyright status): unavailable.

…Called The Harp Without the Crown – the name of a boat. No, the name of the flag the Irish boat had when she was leaving Ireland. And Thomas O’Brien was the name of the boat, and the flag that she hung from her foremost mast was the Harp Without the Crown.

Oh, Thomas O’Brien it was the ship’s name and she sailed from Dublin town,
Commanded by an Irishman, Tom Russell was his name.
Commanded by a Fenian bold and hailing from Dublin town,
And the flag that she flew from her foremost mast was the Harp Without the Crown.

Singing hurrah, boys, hurrah for the girls of Dublin town,
And hurrah for the bonny green flag andtThe Harp Without the Crown.

It was the seventeenth of March, being on St Patrick’s Day,
Our boat sailed out from Dublin town to [unintelligible] they braved the day.
The crew being all young Irishmen and hailing from Dublin town,
And the flag that they flew from the foremost mast was the Harp Without the Crown.

Singing hurrah, boys, hurrah for the girls of Dublin town,
And hurrah for the bonny green flag and The Harp Without the Crown.

JH: I wish I knew more of that. That’s all I know of it. Well, they were coming to England to do some damage, but that’s all I know of the song. I believe there’s more of that song, you know.

EM: The Harp Without the Crown?

JH: The Harp Without the Crown – you know, the Crown was the British Crown, but they put up the harp and took down the flag, which was the flag they had in Ireland at the time.

Notes

Additional stanzas of this sea-shanty are given in Stan Hugill, Shanties from the Seven Seas: Shipboard Work-Songs and Songs Used as Work-Songs from the Great Days of Sail (London, 1961):

Sometimes we sail for Liverpool
Sometimes we sail for France
Sometimes we sail for Dublin town
To give the girls a chance.

Sometimes we’re bound for furrin’ parts
Sometimes we’re bound for home.
For Johhny’s (Paddy’s) always at his best
Wherever he may roam.

Sometimes the weather’s fine and fair
Sometimes it’s damn well foul
Sometimes it blows a Cape ‘Orn gale
That freezes up your soul.

Sometimes we work as hard as hell
Sometimes our grub it stinks
Enough to make a soldier curse
Or make a bishop blink.

Sometimes we wish we’d never joined
Sometimes we’d like to be
A-sittin in a pub, me boys
A gal sat on each knee.

And when the voyage is all done
And we are off to shore
We’ll spend our money on the gals
and go to sea no more.

This recording was issued on The Road from Conamara (Cló Iar-Chonnachta CICD 143 / Topic TSCD 518D).