One Morning in June

Play recording: One Morning in June

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  • Teideal (Title): One Morning in June.
  • Uimhir Chatalóige Ollscoil Washington (University of Washington Catalogue Number): 781515.
  • Uimhir Chnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann (National Folklore of Ireland Number): none.
  • Uimhir Roud (Roud Number): 3381.
  • Uimhir Laws (Laws Number): none.
  • Uimhir Child (Child Number): none.
  • Cnuasach (Collection): Joe Heaney Collection, University of Washington, Seattle.
  • Teanga na Croímhíre (Core-Item Language): Irish and English.
  • Catagóir (Category): song.
  • Ainm an té a thug (Name of Informant): Joe Heaney.
  • Ainm an té a thóg (Name of Collector): Cynthia Thiessen.
  • Dáta an taifeadta (Recording Date): 06/03/1978.
  • Suíomh an taifeadta (Recording Location): University of Washington, United States of America.
  • Ocáid an taifeadta (Recording Occasion): day class.
  • Daoine eile a bhí i láthair (Others present): Fredric Lieberman.
  • Stádas chóipcheart an taifeadta (Recording copyright status): unavailable.

Well, in the olden times, you know, the women left their face as nature left it, and they used to powder their hair – especially if there was some stranger around the place. And this is what they call a macaronic song – macaronic song, one line in Gaelic and one line in English. It’s not a translation; it’s just the macaronic- the way the song was made. And the man and the girl talking to one another; usually the man speaks the English1.

One morning in June, agus mé ag dul ag spaisteoireacht
Casadh liom cailín, ba ró-dheas a gnaoi
She was so handsome, gur thit mé i ngrá léi
Is d’fhága sí arraing i gceartlar mo chroí.
I asked her her name, nó cad é an ruaig bheannaithe
Chas ins an áit thú, a ghrá ghil mo chroí?
My heart it will break if you don’t come along with me
Slán is beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil.

‘Muise cailín beag óg mé ó cheanntar na farraige
Tógadh go cneasta mé i dtosach mo shaoil
I being so airy2 ós é siúd ba chleachtach liom
That made my own parents and me disagree.
A chuisle ‘s a stór, ach an éistfeá liom tamall
I’ll tell you story a b’ait le do chroí
That I’m a young man who’s totally in love with you
Surely my heart is from roguery free.

Ah, go, you bold rogue! Sure you’re wanting to flatter me
B’fhearr éan ar an láimh ná dhá éan ar an gcraoibh
I’ve neither wheat, potatoes or anything
Ná fiú an phluid leaba bheadh tharainn san oíche.
Ceannóidh mé tae is gléasfad an aice-se
Gúna English cotton den fhaisiún atá daor
So powder your hair, love, and come away along with me
Slán is beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil.

There’s an alehouse nearby, agus beidh muid go maidin ann
If you’re satisfied, a ghrá ghil mo chroí
Early next morning, we’ll send for a clergyman
Beidh muid ceangailte i nganfhios don tsaol.
Beidh muid ag ól a fad ‘s mhairfeas an t-airgead
Then we will take the road home with all speed
When the reckoning is paid, who cares for the landlady?
Slán is beannacht le buaireamh an tsaoil.

Translation

One morning in June, as I went out rambling
I met a young maiden whose looks they were fair
She was so handsome that I fell in love with her
And she left an arrow that pierced through my heart.
I asked her her name, or ‘what blessed chance was it
Sent you to this place, bright love of my heart?
My heart it will break if you don’t come along with me!
Farewell and God bless to the troubles of life!’

‘Musha, I’m a young girl and I live by the seaside
Brought up politely from the day I was born
But I being so airy, and that being my nature,
It made my own parents and me disagree.’
‘My dear and my treasure, listen to me a while
I’ll tell you a tale that will gladden your heart:
That I’m a young man who’s totally in love with you
Surely my heart is from roguery free.’

‘Ah, go, you bold rogue! Sure you’re wanting to flatter me
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
I’ve neither wheat, potatoes or anything
Or even a blanket to cover the bed.’
‘I will buy tea, and I’ll make the place ready
A gown of English cotton – the costliest style;
So powder your hair, love, and come away along with me
Farewell and God bless to the troubles of life!’

‘There’s an alehouse nearby, and we’ll be there ’til morning
If you’re satisfied, bright love of my heart,
Early next morning, we’ll send for a clergyman
We shall be married – and no one will know!
We shall go drinking as long as the money lasts;
Then we will take the road home with all speed
When the reckoning is paid, who cares for the landlady?
Farewell and God bless to the troubles of life!’

Notes

1. Actually, the two characters are equally bi-lingual. Joe may have had it in mind that the man – being the more far-travelled and worldly of the two – would have had better English than the stay-at-home young girl still living with her parents. But such logic doesn’t come into the composition of these songs, and sometimes Joe becomes too analytical about them – perhaps imitating the academics among whom he found himself. Compare his argument about fawns and swans in Molly Bawn for another example.

2. ‘airy’ i.e. carefree, heedless. Joe actually says ‘airly’. Perhaps he means ‘early’ – but given the context, this may be doubtful.

This song is included on Joe’s Topic LP Irish Traditional Songs in Gaelic & English, and also on The Road from Conamara, where its title is given as ‘Slán agus Beannacht le Buaireamh an tSaoil’.

This was recorded while Joe was Artist in Residence at University of Washington.