Dó-ín Dú

Play recording: Dó-ín Dú

view / hide recording details [+/-]

  • Teideal (Title): Dó-ín Dú.
  • Uimhir Chatalóige Ollscoil Washington (University of Washington Catalogue Number): 781514.
  • Uimhir Chnuasach Bhéaloideas Éireann (National Folklore of Ireland Number): none.
  • Uimhir Roud (Roud Number): none.
  • Uimhir Laws (Laws Number): none.
  • Uimhir Child (Child Number): none.
  • Cnuasach (Collection): Joe Heaney Collection, University of Washington, Seattle.
  • Teanga na Croímhíre (Core-Item Language): Irish.
  • Catagóir (Category): song.
  • Ainm an té a thug (Name of Informant): Joe Heaney.
  • Ainm an té a thóg (Name of Collector): Cynthia Thiessen.
  • Dáta an taifeadta (Recording Date): 03/03/1978.
  • Suíomh an taifeadta (Recording Location): University of Washington, United States of America.
  • Ocáid an taifeadta (Recording Occasion): day class.
  • Daoine eile a bhí i láthair (Others present): Fredrick Lieberman.
  • Stádas chóipcheart an taifeadta (Recording copyright status): unavailable.

…Long ago, you see, the land was so poor, that they used to divide one field into two parts – one for grazing the few cows they had, and the other for the crops. This is a working song, now1. And the women… usually walked between the couple of cows and the crops, had the knitting in their hands or something, and they looking over – this is the old, old times now – and they see the house that their people lived in, with the nettles and weeds growing through it. And they pictured their father and mother sitting by the fire. They pictured the ones who had to go away, hoping that they’d send for them in time to come. Praising – it’s all praising the people who lived there, and cutting down on the devils who drove them out. And this is the way they used to do it. They used to rock themselves. It’s like:

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, neanntóg is bláth buí
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, atá ag fás ar áit mo thí
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, is tá mo stór chomh cóir
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, le gloine i dteach an óil
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, marach an droch-shaol
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, bheadh mo mhuintir cruinn
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, neanntóg is bláth buí
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, atá ag fás ar áit mo thí
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, grá mo chroí do chois
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, sí a dhamsódh chuile phort
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Translation

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, nettles and yellow flowers
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, are growing on the site of my house.
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, my love is as proper
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó as a glass in a public house.
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, if it weren’t for the bad times
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, my family would be together.
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, nettles and yellow flowers
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, are growing on the site of my house.
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, I love your foot
Dó-ín dú ó daighdil-ó, it would dance every jig!
Is dó-ín-dó, dú ó daighdil-ó.

Notes

1. Joe means – and explains elsewhere – that songs like this might be sung while at work, but not that they were necessary to organizing the work itself.

Three verses of this song were recorded in 1952 by Alan Lomax from Maggie Ní Dhonnchadha in Feenish Island, near Carna; the air and two of the stanzas are identical to the way Joe sings them here. A sleeve-note to this item, which is headed ‘Amhrán Fosuíochta’ (Herding Song), reads: ‘The rocky land of Conamara is split and split again into thousands of patches, some hardly big enough to tether a goat. The same tiny bit of land may be divided into an oatfield and a pasture. The girls have to keep the cows out of the corn, and this is one of their herding songs, sung in Conamara style.’ See Columbia World Library of Folk and Primitive Music: Ireland (Rounder CD 1742). As we have noted previously, it seems highly probable that Joe was familiar with this recording, and he may have elaborated on the sleeve-note for his introduction to the song here.

The song was also recorded from Carna singer Sorcha Ní Ghuairim (1911-1976), whom Joe much admired; Sorcha’s version runs to eight stanzas and uses a different air to the one Joe sings here. See Amhráin Shorcha Ní Ghuairim: Traditional Songs from Conamara (Gael-Linn CEFCD 182).

This song was recorded while Joe was Artist in Residence at University of Washington.